Category Archives: YESTERDAYS BLACK MALE

JAN MATZELIGER, SHOE LASTER.

On this day March 20th, 1883 Shoe maker Jan Metzeliger filed and received a patent for his shoe lasting machine.

A shoe “Last” is the mold of one’s foot used to make and customize shoes. Sewing the shoe together was a great hand skill in which one could produce 50 pairs of shoes in a ten hour day. Metzeliger’s machine produced 150 pairs in the same time.

Unfortunately Metzeliger sacrificed his health for his machine starving himself working long hours. He developed tuberculosis and died before his 37th birthday never truly benefiting financially off his machine.

Advertisements

THE FAIR EMPLOYMENT PRACTICE COMMITTEE OF 1941

On this day March 12, 1941 the “Fair Employment Practice Committee” (FEPC) was created to help African Americans and other minorities gain access to better job opportunities.

Through reconstruction many Blacks were unable to sustain a livable wage due to the shut out of blacks from civil work and trades. The committee was put in place by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

The true purpose was to ban the government and unions from employing minorities during war time as we were entering World War 2. Having a knack for using people and throwing them away, after WW2 funding for the commettiee was cut and thus the problems with employment we faced before we continue to face today.

DRED SCOTT V. SANDFORD

On this day March 6th 1857 the United States supreme court decided 7-2 against Dred Scott claiming him nor any other person of African ancestry could claim citizenship thus cannot sue the United States government under “Diversity of citizenship” rules.

Scott sued the United States for the freedom of himself along with his wife and children because they illegally held as slaves in the free States of Illinois and the territory of Wisconsin.

Illinois was a free state under the “Northwest Ordinance of 1787” and the territory of Wisconsin which became Minnesota was a free state under the Missouri compromise of 1820. Scott lived in Illinois in 1830 and in Wisconsin with his family in 1836.

The news made national news and was one of kicksrarter to the American civil war. Scott and his family was eventually freed but sadly he died 18 months later of tuberculosis.

« Older Entries